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Australia

This tag is associated with 658 posts

The proposed changes to Medicare: are they enough?


The Australian Government has recently announced proposed changes to the country’s Medicare system. The proposed changes aim to create a more efficient and equitable system for the delivery and funding of Australia’s health care services. Let’s take a closer look at these proposed changes. The proposed changes to Medicare are intended to make the system … Continue reading

Poverty in Australia


Poverty in Australia is a growing concern as it affects more and more people every year. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, over 3.2 million Australians, or approximately 13.5%, are living in poverty, meaning that they live on less than 50% of the median income. This means that more than one in eight Australians … Continue reading

Universal Basic Income in Australia


Over the years, Australia just like other developed countries have been thinking of introducing a universal basic income (UBI). But what is it, and what are the arguments for and against? A UBI is a form of income that is offered by the government to its citizens with disregard to their employment status. This form … Continue reading

Voice to Parliament: the dirty tricks of the no-campaigners


Constitutional recognition through a Voice to Parliament would give Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people agency to help inform decisions that impact their lives. Yet there are those that are against this purely on principle, rather than on any facts or details of the proposed Voice. Why is this so? First, let’s look at what … Continue reading

China have just made our housing crisis worse


More than 40,000 Chinese university students could arrive in Australia in the next few weeks as a result of a Chinese government ban on online studying. The ban affects all students located in China who are studying university courses online through an Australian university. China have decreed that they will no longer recognise these online … Continue reading

The problems with the NDIS


Now in its fourth year of implementation, the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) is an Australian Government initiative providing funding for disability support and services. This insurance-based scheme is designed to provide people with a significant and permanent disability with the necessary and reasonable support they require to enjoy an ordinary lifestyle. While the NDIS … Continue reading

We need a Centrelink Royal Commission


The Australian government established Centrelink with the primary purpose of providing aid to individuals who are in need of it. Unfortunately, Australian residents don’t believe the agency has performed effectively, which is why a Royal Commission is needed to intervene and restore order. But why is a Royal Commission necessary, and what will its objectives … Continue reading

Australia Day or Invasion Day?


A nation’s national day of celebration is meant to unite a country, but in recent years that has not been the case in Australia. So is it time to change the date we celebrate our national day? The date of 26 January has always been controversial as our national day of celebration, even though it … Continue reading

Centrelink are still using income averaging


Income averaging was found to be illegal by the Federal Court in the Robodebt Test Case of Amato vs Commonwealth (2019), yet Centrelink still use this methodology when calculating income for certain windfalls. These windfalls include lottery wins, inheritances, gifts, bequests, insurance payments, bursaries, scholarships and anything else Centrelink decide is income, if they are … Continue reading

Centrelink needs to be broken up


Centrelink is a totally dysfunctional organisation, due in large part to the fact that it has become too big to be able to function efficiently or effectively. They administer all forms of benefit payments, and the call centre staff rarely know the answers to an enquiry when they are called. That is, if one can … Continue reading

Bring back the CES (Commonwealth Employment Service)


Job Services Australia, or Workforce Australia as it is now called, has failed to live up to the promises the Howard government made when they introduced it in 1998. Originally known as the Job Network, it has devolved into a giant money making venture by about 30 multinational organisations, and offers few tangible services to … Continue reading

Centrelink staff need to learn some manners


One thing that was consistent during the Robodebt Royal Commission was Centrelink’s victims reporting that staff had been rude and aggressive. Sadly, this has not changed. Witnesses at the Royal Commission recounted that staff had yelled at them, mocked them, refused to listen to any defence and generally treated them with contempt. Witnesses recalled being … Continue reading

Dominic Perrottet and the Nazi uniform: he doesn’t know what he did was wrong


Dominic Perrottet has failed to apologise to everybody that he offended by wearing a Nazi uniform, showing he doesn’t really understand what he did was wrong and why. To be fair, a 21 year old probably wouldn’t understand the significance of the Nazi uniform, and he shouldn’t be judged on what he did as a … Continue reading

Why retrospective law can be applied to the NACC


With the passing of legislation for the National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC), it is worth reflecting on the history of retrospective law in Australia, and how the courts have found it to be legal. It is possible in Australia to break laws that have not yet been created, but there are instances where many would believe … Continue reading

Churches are businesses and should pay tax


It is difficult to know how much revenue churches make in Australia each year, but some estimates put it at $40 billion dollars, all tax free. This means Australia is missing out on about $10 billion dollars a year in taxes. Not just corporate tax, but also income tax, GST, payroll tax, council rates, land … Continue reading

It is social security, not welfare


In the pre-Centrelink days, the unemployed, disabled, aged, marginalised and students were treated with some respect by the Australian government. Those days are long gone. Up until 1997, Australia had the Department of Social Security, which administered social security payments. This is how they were referred to by both the government and the department. Then … Continue reading

Why retrospective law can be applied to the NACC


It is possible in Australia to break laws that have not yet been created, but there are instances where many would believe this is highly appropriate. The National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) may be one of these. The two main principles that exist in rule of law in Australia are that if the person doing the … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1974, Cyclone Tracy devastated the city of Darwin, killing 71 people


On 24 December 1974, Cyclone Tracy devastated the city of Darwin. The official death toll was 71. Cyclone Tracy, which mostly hit Darwin in the small hours of Christmas Day 1974, killed 71 people and devastated 80 per cent of the city. In the days and weeks following the disaster, most of the traumatised population … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1948, HMAS Sydney, the first aircraft carrier of the Royal Australian Navy, was commissioned


On 16 December 1948, HMAS Sydney, the first aircraft carrier of the Royal Australian Navy, was commissioned. HMAS Sydney (R17/A214/P214/L134) was a Majestic-class light aircraft carrier operated by the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). She was built for the Royal Navy and was launched as HMS Terrible (93) in 1944, but was not completed before the end of World War II. The carrier was sold to Australia in 1947, completed, … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1900, the first Governor-General, Lord Hopetoun, committed the so-called Hopetoun Blunder


On 15 December 1900, upon his arrival in Australia, the first Governor-General, Lord Hopetoun, committed the so-called Hopetoun Blunder. The Hopetoun Blunder was a political event immediately prior to the Federation of the British colonies in Australia. Federation was scheduled to occur on 1 January 1901, but since the general election for the first Parliament of Australia was not to be … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1918, the first Victorian Farmers Union member was elected to federal parliament. They would eventually become the National Party.


On 14 December 1918, the first Victorian Farmers Union member was elected to parliament as a result of the introduction of preferential voting. It was later to become the National Party. The Victorian Farmers’ Union (VFU) was an association of farmers and primary producers formed in 1914 in the Australian state of Victoria. Although initially formed as an … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 2005, Bradley John Murdoch was convicted of murdering Peter Falconio in the Australian outback


On 13 December 2005, Bradley John Murdoch was convicted of murdering Peter Falconio in the Australian outback whilst travelling with girlfriend Joanne Lees. Bradley John Murdoch is an Australian criminal serving life imprisonment for the July 2001 murder of English backpacker Peter Falconio in Australia. He will be 74 when eligible for parole in 2032. Murdoch is being held in Darwin Correctional Centre … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1815, Captain James Kelly set out on circumnavigation of Tasmania, during which important observations were made on the resources of the west coast


On 12 December 1815, Captain James Kelly set out on circumnavigation of Tasmania, during which important observations were made on the resources of the west coast. James Kelly, Australian mariner, explorer and port official, was born on 24 December 1791 at Parramatta, New South Wales. He was probably the son of James Kelly, a cook in … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 2005, the Cronulla riots took place


On 11 December 2005, the Cronulla riots took place. The 2005 Cronulla riots were a race riot in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. It began in the beachside suburb of Cronulla on 11 December, and spread over to additional suburbs the next few nights. The riots were triggered by an event the previous Sunday, when an altercation turned physical between a group of youths … Continue reading

On this day (Australia): In 1817, bushranger Michael Howe was caught, but escaped after killing his captors


On 10 December 1817, bushranger Michael Howe ws caught, but escaped after killing his captors. Michael Howe was a British convict who became a notorious bushranger and gang leader in Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania), Australia. Howe was born in 1787 at Pontefract, Yorkshire, England, son of Thomas Howe and his wife Elizabeth. He served two years on a merchant vessel at Hull before deserting to join the navy as … Continue reading

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